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What we offer: Tutoring

Being a student can be difficult at the best of times, taking exams and undertaking assignments can exacerbate problems and make matters worse. This is particularly true if you are not sure what it is you are supposed to be doing. And of course if you have a perceived disability such as Dyslexia things can get even worse.

Which is where having help from a qualified tutor can help enormously.

Qualified

Jeremy has recent experience of what it’s like to go through the exam scenario, a solid understanding of assignment briefs having written dozens in the past and knows what marking is all about having marked well over 1,000 assignments in the past.

Proven track record

Jeremy has a Post Graduate Certificate in Education, a Masters in Education, a B.A. in Arts and Cultural Management and he has Dyslexia. He taught at South Devon College for eight years predominantly in Performing Arts but also taught study skills and business. For most of this time he also taught students with disabilities (dyslexia, dyspraxia, ADHD, Asberger’s Syndrome etc.) in a variety of subjects e.g. sailing, law, animal husbandry, psychology and criminology, outdoor leisure and 3D art. Jeremy has also tutored at Plymouth University. He currently tutors students with Learning Difficulties at The Key at Hannah’s at Seale Hayne, Newton Abbot.

Academic support
Jeremy can offer help and academic support for:

· Level 2 (GCSE)
· Level 3 (A level / Diploma)
· Level 4/5/6 (Degree)
· Level 7/8 (Postgraduate)

Peace of mind
Jeremy has an advanced DBS certificate and has professional indemnity insurance.

Any other questions? Please Contact Me

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FOLLOW JEREMY HOLLOWAY – TUTOR

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Apparently just 16% of people with autism are in full-time paid work, while less than 6% of learning disabled people are in full-time employment. Surprised? No, nor me. But when you teach people with learning difficulties you do see a different side to society. After all, a person with a learning difficulty is still a person and a student with a learning difficulty is still a student. Teaching people with learning difficulties (as I do) can be extremely rewarding. Our achievements on a standard academic chart may be minuscule but to us, they're achievements, and as such are celebrated accordingly.....

Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo
... See MoreSee Less

Apparently just 16% of people with autism are in full-time paid work, while less than 6% of learning disabled people are in full-time employment. Surprised? No, nor me. But when you teach people with learning difficulties you do see a different side to society. After all, a person with a learning difficulty is still a person and a student with a learning difficulty is still a  student. Teaching people with learning difficulties (as I do)  can be extremely rewarding. Our achievements on a standard academic chart may be minuscule but to us, theyre achievements, and as such are celebrated accordingly.....

Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

Odd world, just been asked to support a student undertaking an essay to start her degree and also helping a student attempting an M.A. in Life Drawing. Interesting, being a tutor..... ... See MoreSee Less

Odd world, just been asked to support a student undertaking an essay to start her degree and also helping a student attempting an M.A. in Life Drawing. Interesting, being a tutor.....

An ex-student of mine recently asked me how you learn academic speak, that almost impossible language used by academics, usually in research and usually situated in universities.

My answer might be useful to others having the same problem. I have always had to try and understand academic speak, even when it was ordinary language because I'm dyslexic and need to convert text into something I can understand, for me it's images / graphics. Possibly phonics as well. Quite often the meaning is quite straightforward, the writer has used one unknown word instead of ten known ones. And quite often it's just showing off and/or being lazy!

It can take a long time to understand but if it's worth the effort then you need to do it. Take your time and work through what it actually means. Sometimes you only need one specific paragraph so you decipher that one and skim over the rest. There's no easy way to learn it unfortunately. I can help of course, it's what I am trained to do; P.M. me if necessary. Good luck........
... See MoreSee Less

An ex-student of mine recently asked me how you learn academic speak, that almost impossible language used by academics, usually in research and usually situated in universities.

My answer might be useful to others having the same problem. I have always had to try and understand academic speak, even when it was ordinary language because Im dyslexic and need to convert text into something I can understand, for me its images / graphics. Possibly phonics as well. Quite often the meaning is quite straightforward, the writer has used one unknown word instead of ten known ones. And quite often its just showing off and/or being lazy!

It can take a long time to understand but if its worth the effort then you need to do it. Take your time and work through what it actually means. Sometimes you only need one specific paragraph so you decipher that one and skim over the rest. Theres no easy way to learn it unfortunately. I can help of course, its what I am trained to do; P.M. me if necessary. Good luck........

It is disappointing but not surprising that police have been called in to investigate another exam leak after an unknown number of students had advance sight of part of a GCSE religious studies (RS) paper last month (May). It is the latest of a series of damaging security breaches to hit summer exams in recent years, with social media enabling cheats to disseminate leaked questions quickly and easily.

But why does it happen and why is one exam paper so important? For those of us who find extreme difficulty in undertaking exams (yours truly has a 1st class honours Degree, a PGCE and a Masters Distinction but still finds it difficult to do a basic level 2 exam) the whole process is fundamentally flawed. It is generally accepted that exams are not a good method of assessment so why the fuss? Cheating is wrong, but in life everyone cheats if they can get away with it. Perhaps, rather than tinker with the shortcomings of the exam process the whole process of assessment should be overhauled........

Photograph: Gareth Fuller/PA
... See MoreSee Less

It is disappointing but not surprising that police have been called in to investigate another exam leak after an unknown number of students had advance sight of part of a GCSE religious studies (RS) paper last month (May). It is the latest of a series of damaging security breaches to hit summer exams in recent years, with social media enabling cheats to disseminate leaked questions quickly and easily. 

But why does it happen and why is one exam paper so important? For those of us who find extreme difficulty in undertaking exams (yours truly has a 1st class honours Degree, a PGCE and a Masters Distinction but still finds it difficult to do a basic level 2 exam) the whole process is fundamentally flawed. It is generally accepted that exams are not a good method of assessment so why the fuss? Cheating is wrong, but in life everyone cheats if they can get away with it. Perhaps, rather than tinker with the shortcomings of the exam process the whole process of assessment should be overhauled........

Photograph: Gareth Fuller/PA

"Being able to understand the problem is most of the answer" and most teachers understand this. Being able to dissect a problem, departmentalise it and create a coherent, pragmatic and of course correct answer should be logical and systematic but for some it isn't easy. Dyslexic people are good at being creative, graphical, illustrative and phonic, though of course some of us can struggle at times. I am dyslexic (an extra ability rather than a dis-ability) but managed to get my Masters in Education by finding my own method of learning.You can too, it needs someone who has struggled to understand someone else who struggles. Please feel free to get in touch for an informal chat about any academic needs at any level......... ... See MoreSee Less

Being able to understand the problem is most of the answer and most teachers understand this. Being able to dissect a problem, departmentalise it and create a coherent, pragmatic and of course correct answer should be logical and systematic but for some it isnt easy. Dyslexic people are good at being creative, graphical, illustrative and phonic, though of course some of us can struggle at times. I am dyslexic (an extra ability rather than a dis-ability) but managed to get my Masters in Education by finding my own method of learning.You can too, it needs someone who has struggled to understand someone else who struggles. Please feel free to get in touch for an informal chat about any academic needs at any level.........

It's easy to panic when faced with something you don't know. In fact, that's probably the only time you will be scared, when you don't know what is likely to happen. Which is why preparation is essential in education. And once you're sure of what is to come suddenly life is a lot easier........ ... See MoreSee Less

Its easy to panic when faced with something you dont know. In fact, thats probably the only time you will be scared, when you dont know what is likely to happen. Which is why preparation is essential in education. And once youre sure of what is to come suddenly life is a lot easier........

Do you have to be clever to achieve a qualification? No, but there are several other factors that will need to be in place. You will need persistence of course, studying is rarely easy. A clean, clear working environment is essential, working in bed or on a cluttered kitchen table is not good. And a clear methodology, which basically means a thought about how the qualification will be achieved, such as studying at a certain time in a certain place using certain equipment. And of course studying will take priority at times so it will need to fit in to a timetable. It can't be an added extra. As long as these things things are in place there should be no stopping you succeeding,.... ... See MoreSee Less

Do you have to be clever to achieve a qualification? No, but there are several other factors that will need to be in place. You will need persistence of course, studying is rarely easy. A clean, clear working environment is essential, working in bed or on a cluttered kitchen table is not good. And a clear methodology, which basically means a thought about how the qualification will be achieved, such as studying at a certain time in a certain place using certain equipment. And of course studying will take priority at times so it will need to fit in to a timetable. It cant be an added extra. As long as these things things are in place there should be no stopping you succeeding,....
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